• Kinashi-San

10 pros and cons of living in Canada

Updated: Feb 16

There are many advantages to living in a certain city, but in the same way, as there are many disadvantages, for this reason, in this article we present to you some pros and cons of living in Canada.


PROS

  1. Going to the doctor or going to the hospital for treatment is mostly free. Going to the doctor or going to the hospital for treatment is mostly free. Some expats find that the American way of life and culture are well combined with Europeans "socialists" benefits (such as the public health system, with free basic care for all citizens and permanent residents).

  2. Canada's labour market is strong.

  3. Canada is a country with an excellent international reputation and a source of pride.

  4. Economically, it is a stable country with a solid banking system and low corruption.

  5. Unemployment rates tend to below.

  6. Canadian cities are among the safest cities in the world, with very low crime rates.

  7. It is a beautiful and colourful country, with a wide range of climates and natural environments. Nature lovers (as well as winter sports enthusiasts) will find themselves at home.

  8. We can find great food in all the great cuisines of the world in big cities (especially in Toronto and Montreal).

  9. Canada has a few world-class universities, with relatively affordable enrollment.

  10. Canada has good relations with most countries in the world. This facilitates the migration of people, travel on tourist visas, and even the ability to become Canadian expats with ease.



CONS

  1. Living in Canada means knowing that much of the country can be very cold in winter. Except in the Vancouver area, other places sustain 4-5 months of very cold climate, where people have to shovel snowy roads, face unpleasant winter roads with high heating costs in winter. The Canadian winter should not be underestimated.

  2. Childcare for those who live or want to live in Canada can take up a large chunk of their budget, according to parents in Canada: three in five (60%) do not consider this service affordable and almost a quarter (23% ) say it is very difficult to pay.

  3. The cost of living is expensive (buying a home, telephone and internet plans, airline ticket prices to travel within the country or to nearby destinations).

  4. Finding a job that can be lived and that is strictly aligned with your area of knowledge and specific interests can be difficult, especially if you are an immigrant.

  5. Taxes are very high, the average Canadian pay around 42% personal income tax and the GST time, fuel taxes, capital gains, property taxes, and alcohol and fuel taxes, tobacco, is almost 52%. All the benefits of living in Canada (healthcare, large public schools, for example) come at a price, be prepared to pay high taxes.

  6. Tuition fees for university studies are quite high unlike countries like Germany, Brazil, Portugal Finland, Norway, Sweden, Argentina, Denmark, Greece, Kenya, Morocco, Egypt, Uruguay, France and Turkey, where education is free or nominal. But less than the United States and Japan.

  7. A Canadian dollar is even lower than the US dollar, currently worth 75 cents. The battle for online shopping continues to be very real.

  8. In some areas of the industry, the salary is not very high.

  9. In the case in Quebec, there is poor quality in the medical system, no family doctor available for everyone, or the waiting list is very long (some patients can wait more than 24 hours at the hospital). No doctor comes to your home. Rural areas may not be sufficiently covered compared to metropolitan areas.

  10. Although the economy is prosperous, many young Canadians end up leaving the country in search of greater technological and financial employment opportunities.


The important thing is to be prepared and informed, and above all, not to think that everything will be easier here than elsewhere. In reality, everything will be different. Sometimes you will find it better, sometimes you will find it worse. There is no rule or a perfect country.


But in the end, in Canada as elsewhere, it is important to keep in mind that the immigration experience is only positive if you want to integrate, immerse yourself in the host culture and learn from its hosts.


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